Thursday, October 20, 2016

Silly Season Update - October

The 2016 Silly Season has been a wild one, and there's a lot left to go! Here's an updated team and driver update for the 2017 Verizon IndyCar Season:


AJ Foyt Enterprises

UNCONFIRMED

#14 AJ Foyt Enterprises

With AJ Foyt Enterprises likely to switch to Chevrolet engines, the money that Honda was sending Takuma Sato is gone, meaning Sato is likely gone to despite a good relationship with the Foyts. That leaves the door open to many possibilities, especially for some young Americans.

Top three candidates:
1) Carlos Munoz
2) Takuma Sato
3) Juan Pablo Montoya


#41 AJ Foyt Enterprises

Jack Hawksworth is having tea somewhere pondering his future as a sports car driver. Meanwhile, his seat has been vacated. Here are three different drivers from above that could be in the seat:

Top three candidates:
1) Sage Karam 
2) Conor Daly
3) Santi Urrutia

Sonoma Raceway - Day 1
There's one seat we know is open for sure... (Photo: Jonathan Ferrey / Getty Images North America)

Andretti Autosport

CONFIRMED

#27 Marco Andretti

Marco Andretti has driven for his dad every season since 2006. We do know that hhgregg is jumping onboard in a greater sponsorship role in 2017, but after a dismal 2016, staff changes could help his 2016 season.


#28 Ryan Hunter-Reay

Former Indianapolis 500 winner and IndyCar Champion Ryan Hunter-Reay has signed a contract extension with Andretti Autosport until the end of the 2020 season. DHL will return as the sponsor for those seasons.


#98 Alexander Rossi

Despite rumors of Marco Andretti shifting over to the Bryan Herta coordinated effort with Andretti Autosport, the 100th Indianapolis 500 winner Alexander Rossi will return to the #98 car for 2017 and beyond. There were rumors of him maybe moving to Team Penske or back to Formula 1, but Rossi decided to stay in IndyCar.


UNCONFIRMED

#26 Andretti Autosport

Carlos Munoz is growing frustrated at Andretti Autosport about the amount of sponsor dollars he brings to the team vs. the benefit for the money he brings. He is also frustrated at the lack of salary he earns based on his results. Teammates Ryan Hunter-Reay and Marco Andretti get paid handsomely, while Munoz gets table scraps. If he has a chance to move elsewhere, he will. I am sure something could work out, but IF he moves on, I listed my top-three candidates for that ride.

Top three candidates:
1) Takuma Sato
2) Juan Pablo Montoya
3) Robin Frijns



Chip Ganassi Racing

CONFIRMED

#9 Scott Dixon

Biggest news for Chip Ganassi Racing this offseason was switching from Chevrolet to Honda. Despite having the bullseye off of his back, Scott Dixon will be back with Chip Ganassi Racing in 2017. The sponsorship is said to be announced soon, so watch out for that.


#10 Tony Kanaan

The rumor mill was surrounding Tony Kanaan pretty hard heading into the silly season. Despite all the rumors, Kanaan will return to Ganassi for a fourth season with NTT Data as the primary sponsor.

Sonoma Raceway - Day 2
Tony Kanaan will be back in the blue NTT Data colors in 2017 (Photo: Jonathan Ferrey / Getty Images North America)

#83 Charlie Kimball

Despite a bumpy 2017 season, Charlie Kimball will likely be back with the backing of his diabetic pharmaceutical sponsorship.


UNCONFIRMED

#8 Chip Ganassi Racing

This is an entry that will either happen because of one driver or likely fold. Max Chilton brought huge sponsorship dollars from Arthur J. Gallagher, a brokerage insurance firm. There have been ties that Max may head off to Trevor Carlin's rumored IndyCar team, but sources say that Max should be returning to Ganassi for a second season. If Max doesn't return, it's tough to see this entry happening without sponsorship backing that a driver would bring.

Top three candidates:
1) Max Chilton
2) Juan Pablo Montoya
3) Whoever brings money... Haha



Dale Coyne Racing 

CONFIRMED

#18 Sebastien Bourdais

In a shocking twist of historical proportions, Dale Coyne was rumored to have signed Sebastien Bourdais before the end of the season. Before the first test of the offseason, Dale confirmed the rumors, which is five months before schedule. Bourdais reunites with the team that brought him back into IndyCar after his failed stint in Formula 1. Coyne has also been hard at work beefing up the engineering staff.


UNCONFIRMED

#19 Dale Coyne Racing

You're guess is as good as mine as to who will drive in the second Dale Coyne car. RC Enerson seems like the obvious candidate, but it could be a score of other drivers.

Top three candidates:
1) RC Enerson
2) Conor Daly
3) Santi Urrutia



Ed Carpenter Racing

CONFIRMED

#20 Ed Carpenter (Ovals)

Ed Carpenter has retained the services for Ed Carpenter at Ed Carpenter Racing for the 2017 oval schedule. He'll look to bounce back after a tough 2016 season.


UNCONFIRMED

#20 Ed Carpenter Racing (Road Courses)

Despite not entering in the first part of the season, the road course car pioneered by Mike Conway saw action after the Month of May. Spencer Pigot took the seat and performed quite well. He definitely has a future in the series.

Top three candidates:
1) Spencer Pigot
2) Conor Daly
3) Sage Karam


#21 Ed Carpenter Racing

With superstar Josef Newgarden off to greener pastures, Ed Carpenter is left with some options to fill the seat. The obvious candidate is JR Hildebrand, who has been testing with the team the last couple of seasons and running the races in May, with some good success. Other drivers on the radar should be Spencer Pigot, Carlos Munoz, Juan Pablo Montoya, and Sage Karam.

Top three candidates:
1) JR Hildebrand
2) Juan Pablo Montoya
3) Carlos Munoz


Sonoma Raceway - Day 1
Josef Newgarden has left ECR for Team Penske (Photo: Jonathan Ferrey / Getty Images North America)

KV Racing

UNCONFIRMED

#11 KV Racing

Who knows, KV Racing may not even be called KV Racing next season. Jimmy Vasser, the 'V' in KV is intent on running the team next year, while the 'K', Kevin Kalkhoven, who owns Cosworth, is trying to scale back his financial and time commitment in IndyCar. Without the money necessary, Vasser may have to look elsewhere either for sponsors or a new partner. Insert Trevor Carlin, the feeder series giant of Europe who joined Indy Lights last year with the plan to move up to IndyCar in a couple of seasons. Merging with a current team would make a lot more sense for him than starting from scratch. While nothing is official yet, I wouldn't be surprised to see it happen.

Top three candidates:
1) Matthew Brabham
2) Pastor Maldonado
3) Oriol Servia


UNCONFIRMED

#TBA KV Racing

If Carlin does join forces with Vasser, look for Indy Lights champion Ed Jones to join forces with his boss for the last two season in IndyCar for at least three races.

Top three candidates:
1) Ed Jones
2) Matthew Brabham
3) Pastor Maldonado



Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing

CONFIRMED

#15 Graham Rahal

Back for another season is the consistenly best Honda entry (in the aero-kit era at least) of Graham Rahal. Anyone else notice how many sponsors they pack on that car? It is wonderful.


UNCONFIRMED

#16 Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing

The second RLL car made three races last year with Indy Lights champion Spencer Pigot and his scholarship money paying the way. While the team has thrived under a one car banner, two cars is the way to go. It's all about staffing that second car correctly to compliment Graham's car. Who races in it, even if it is a part-time ride? Graham wants a veteran, but if Jones doesn't land with Carlin, I could see the same thing that the team did with Pigot last year.

Top three candidates:
1) Oriol Servia
2) Ed Jones
3) Juan Pablo Montoya



Schmidt Peterson Motorsports

CONFIRMED

#5 James Hinchcliffe

Should I get my dancing puns out of the way now or later? Anyways, James Hinchcliffe will rumba his way into the 2017 in his third year with SPM Racing. He had a very good 2016 season, as he two-stepped to many good results. Some of his finishes made me want to tango, while other misfortunes made me want to join cheerleading.


#7 Mikhail Aleshin

RACER confirmed that everyone at SPM is happy with Mikhail Aleshin and SMP Bank, and that there is no reason to not expect Aleshin back next season.



Team Penske

CONFIRMED

#1 Simon Pagenaud

The champ is here! Simon Pagenaud enters year three of his tenure at Team Penske, and he comes back as the champion. Look for Pagenaud to be the bar that everyone aims for next year, as he will run the #1 car next year per the champions reward,


#2 Josef Newgarden

The biggest offseason move in a long-time is Josef Newgarden. The former Indy Lights champion has the charisma, tenacity, and skill set to drive at Team Penske. Josef could be an instant championship contender next season.


#3 Helio Castroneves

Not surprisngly, Helio Castroneves will return to Team Penske for another season. He has raced full-time with the team every season since 2000. Despite that, he still has not won a championship. Will 2017 be the year?

GoPro Grand Prix of Sonoma
#12 Will Power leads Helio Castroneves at Sonoma (Photo: Lachian Cunnignham / Getty Images North America)

#12 Will Power

Simon Pagenaud may have won the championship in 2016, but Will Power may have tied him for best driver. After missing the first race and struggling prior to June, Power was absolutely incredible in the last two-thirds of the season. He will be back with Team Penske, the team he has driven for since 2009.


Let me know what drivers you want to see where!

-Matthew Hickey

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Asterisk Era*

We all know the story. The glittering CART series running their final season as a unified series before splitting into two open-wheel categories: Championship Auto Racing Teams (CART) and the Indy Racing League (IRL).

The Indy Racing League was the brain child of Tony George, former President and CEO of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and son of Mari Hulman George. His idea was to cut costs and eliminate the possibility of competitive advantages gained through “rigged” engine deals, like the Mercedes-Ilmor engine that led to Team Penske’s domination of the 1994 CART Season (but that's only part of the story).

In 1996, a dream for Tony George and many in the racing world was realized, as the IRL launched in Orlando, Florida at the Walt Disney World Speedway. Buzz Calkins would go onto win the race, one of three races on the season. Watching the broadcast gives people at home a sense of optimism and pleasure, as these weren’t drivers well-known throughout America (apart from maybe guys like 1990 Indianapolis 500 winner Arie Luyendyk), but these were drivers that were given the chance to do what they possibly never would get the chance to do in CART: race in a top-tier open-wheel series. CART was the exclusive group of jocks to the IRL’s bandits of loners. And yet, there was something about watching the race that made me personally want to reach for my dreams.

While CART remained exciting as ever while also possessing the big teams, big names, big money, and big venues, they lacked two things: 1) the IRL delivered sheer excitement through wheel-to-wheel racing at high speed venues. 2) the IRL had the Indianapolis 500. While CART downplayed the importance of the Indianapolis 500 after The Split (including the creation of a new race on Memorial Day weekend at Michigan International Speedway called the US 500), it was clear after only a couple years that despite missing the big names, the Indianapolis 500 was still the pinnacle of American open wheel racing no matter who raced in it.

Over time, IRL and CART continually pulled fans from each series to the point where both series’ were hurting. In 2002, the balance of the scales tipped. Team Penske, arguably the greatest team in the history of American open-wheel racing, left CART for the IRL. The following year, Chip Ganassi Racing (who ran teams in CART and IRL in 2002) and Michael Andretti (who formed Andretti Green Racing with Kim Green) left CART for the IRL starting in 2003. The momentum clearly was now on the oval-only IRL series. CART would be renamed into Champ Car in 2004, and would file for bankruptcy in 2007. IRL would budge and adopt road courses from the 2005 season and onwards. Champ Car would merge with IRL in 2008 to form a unified IndyCar Series once again.

But during those initial years of the IRL, how much weight can we put into the results? Like I said, it was extraordinary to see guys like Davey Hamilton, Tony Stewart, Paul Durant, Scott Harrington, and a countless field of “no-name drivers” who didn’t lack talent, but did lack the street cred, money, or skills (or a combination of all three) to land a ride into CART.

For this reason, I ALWAYS chuckle when I hear Buddy Lazier get mentioned amongst guys like Al Unser and AJ Foyt as an Indianapolis 500 winner. Unser and Foyt had to beat legendary drivers and teams to reach the pinnacle. Buddy Lazier had to outmatch David Kurdave and Alessandro Zampedri. Sure, every Indianapolis 500 field has some “weak-links”, but the 1996-1999 fields were especially thin in big-name talent.

Buddy celebrates his win at the 1996 Indianapolis 500 (Photo: IndyCar Media)

Just let us compare the field quality from the 1996 US 500 and the 1996 Indianapolis 500:

Position
1996 US 500
1996 Indianapolis 500
1
Jimmy Vasser (W) (C)
Buddy Lazier (W) (C)
2
Mauricio Gugelmin (W)
Davy Jones
3
Roberto Moreno (W)
Richie Hearn (W)
4
Andre Ribeiro (W)
Alessandro Zampedri
5
Mark Blundell (W)
Roberto Guerrero (W)
6
Eddie Lawson
Eliseo Salazar (W)
7
Paul Tracy (W) (C)
Danny Ongais (W)
8
Al Unser Jr. (W) (C)
Hideshi Matsuda
9
Gil de Ferran (W) (C)
Robbie Buhl (W)
10
Emerson Fittipaldi (W) (C)
Scott Sharp (W) (C)
11
Parker Johnstone
Eddie Cheever Jr. (W)
12
Christian Fittipaldi (W)
Davey Hamilton
13
Greg Moore (W)
Michel Jourdain Jr. (W)
14
Hiro Matsushita
Lyn St. James
15
Bryan Herta (W)
Scott Harrington
16
Stefan Johansson
Arie Luyendyk (W)
17
Alex Zanardi (W) (C)
Buzz Calkins (W) (C)
18
Jeff Krosnoff
Jim Guthrie
19
Bobby Rahal (W) (C)
Mark Dismore (W)
20
Robby Gordon (W)
Mike Groff
21
Gary Bettenhausen (W)
Fermin Velez
22
Juan Manuel Fangio II
Joe Gosek
23
Michael Andretti (W) (C)
Brad Murphey
24
Raul Boesel (W)
Tony Stewart (W) (C)
25
Fredrik Ekblom
Racin Gardner
26
Scott Pruett (W)
Marco Greco
27
Adrian Fernandez (W)
Stephane Gregoire
28

Johnny Parsons
29

Johnny O’Connell
30

Michele Alboreto
31

John Paul Jr. (W)
32

Paul Durant
33

Johnny Unser


It is clear to see which field is higher quality, especially given that many of the wins that drivers earned from the 1996 Indianapolis 500 field happened in the weak years of the early IRL Series.
Furthering this line of “weakness,” Target Chip Ganassi Racing entered the 2000 Indianapolis 500 with their CART drivers Juan Pablo Montoya and Jimmy Vasser. Despite the defending IRL Champion Greg Ray claiming the pole. Juan Pablo Montoya, who drove at Indianapolis for the first time just a couple months prior, dominated the race, leading over three-fourths of the laps on his way to his first Indianapolis 500 victory. It wasn’t even close. The fact that a rookie driver could roll up with a team who had just purchased the chassis and could literally and figuratively kick the piss out of the entire IRL-contingent either says something of how good Montoya or Ganassi were, or how the IRL teams couldn’t hold a candle to the pedigree and talent of the CART teams even on their own turf. I’ll call it a mix of both.

After Ganassi did it, every CART team wanted a crack at Indy. Team Penske wanted in on the fun at the Indianapolis 500, which was taken off of the CART schedule after the split. Entering Helio Castroneves and Gil de Ferran in 2001, the team again proved the superiority of CART teams, with Helio taking his first Indianapolis 500 win. By 2002, Team Penske switched to the IRL and was fully invested in the series. They would become the benchmark to beat even to this day.

Jimmy Vasser driving for the then still CART team Chip Ganassi
Racing in the 2001 Indianapolis 500 (Photo: IndyCar Media)

With all that said, my goal is not to diminish the accomplishments of drivers in the asterisk era of the IRL. There are many proud stories and moments for so many people who may have never gotten the chance to race in the glamorized CART Series. But I can’t sit here and say that Buddy Lazier’s name belongs in the same sentence as actual racing legends like Dan Wheldon and Dario Franchitti. I keep picking on Buddy Lazier, and let me be clear, Buddy is a good driver. But we should stop acting like he's IndyCar royalty. That’s just my two cents on The Split.

I can make the same argument on the 2003 CART Season and the 2004-2007 Champ Car seasons, but I'll save that for another day. 

Let me know what you think!


-Matthew Hickey

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Stats Since The Merger

Now that we are nine seasons into "The Merger" between the Indy Racing League and the Champ Car World Series in 2008, there's a lot we can tell about the quality of the IndyCar drivers and the series as a whole. Here is a whole host of statistical categories I've assembled from the IndyCar Series from 2008 onwards:


Number of Races: 153 (excluding Surfers Paradise 2008)


Numbers of Laps Run: 21,271


Number of Cautions: 615


Number of Caution Laps: 3,605


Number of Lead Changes: 1,520


Race Distances in Miles: 36,575


Number of Venues Used: 31


Number of Countries Raced In: 5


Number of American States Raced In: 19


Venues Used Every Season:
- Indianapolis Motor Speedway
- Iowa Speedway
- Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course
- Sonoma Raceway
- Streets of Long Beach
- Streets of St. Petersburg
- Texas Motor Speedway


Number of Teams Who Have Started a Race: 31


Teams Active in All Nine Seasons:
- AJ Foyt Enterprises
- Andretti Autosport
- Chip Ganassi Racing
- Dale Coyne Racing
- Dreyer and Reinbold Racing
- KV Racing
- Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing
- Team Penske
- Schmidt Peterson Motorsports


Most Drivers Used by a Team:
1) Dale Coyne Racing - 21
2) Andretti Autosport - 20
3) Dreyer and Reinbold Racing - 18
3) Schmidt Peterson Motorsports - 18
5) AJ Foyt Enterprises - 15
5) Conquest Racing - 15
5) KV Racing - 15
8) Chip Ganassi Racing - 12
8) Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing - 12
10) Panther Racing - 11


Most Teams Raced For by a Driver:
1) Oriol Servia - 8
1) Ryan Briscoe - 8
3) Ed Carpenter - 6
3) Mike Conway - 6
3) Sebastian Saavedra - 6
3) Tomas Scheckter - 6
7) Graham Rahal - 5
7) JR Hildebrand - 5
7) Justin Wilson - 5
7) Paul Tracy - 5
7) Townsend Bell - 5


Championship Winning Teams:
1) Chip Ganassi Racing - 6
2) Team Penske - 2
3) Andretti Autosport - 1


Most Top-Five Championship Finishes by a Team:
1) Team Penske - 21
2) Chip Ganassi Racing - 12
3) Andretti Autosport - 4
4) Schmidt Peterson Motorsports - 3
5) Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing - 2
6) Ed Carpenter Racing - 1
6) KV Racing - 1
6) Newman-Haas Racing - 1


Most Top-Ten Championship Finishes by a Team:
1) Andretti Autosport - 25
2) Team Penske - 24
3) Chip Ganassi Racing - 22
4) KV Racing - 5
5) Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing - 3
5) Schmidt Peterson Motorsports - 3
7) Dale Coyne Racing - 2
7) Newman-Haas Racing - 2
7) Panther Racing - 2
10) CFH Racing - 1
10) Ed Carpenter Racing - 1


Most Wins by a Team:
1) Team Penske - 54
2) Chip Ganassi Racing - 46
3) Andretti Autosport - 23
4) KV Racing - 6
5) Ed Carpenter Racing - 5
5) Schmidt Peterson Motorsports - 5
7) Dale Coyne Racing - 4
7) Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing - 4
9) CFC Racing - 2
9) Newman-Haas Racing - 2


Most Podiums by a Team:
1) Team Penske - 143
2) Chip Ganassi Racing - 123
3) Andretti Autosport - 83
4) KV Racing - 19
5) Schmidt Peterson Motorsports - 17
6) Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing - 16
7) Dale Coyne Racing - 10
7) Ed Carpenter Racing - 10
9) Newman-Haas Racing - 8
10) Panther Racing - 7


Fastest Laps by a Team:
1) Team Penske - 48
2) Chip Ganassi Racing - 36
3) Andretti Autosport - 18
4) Dreyer and Reinbold Racing - 7
4) KV Racing - 7
6) Dale Coyne Racing - 6
6) Schmidt Peterson Motorsports - 6
8) Ed Carpenter Racing - 5
9) Sarah Fisher Hartman Racing - 4
10) Four teams - 2


Number of Drivers Who Have Started a Race: 100


Most Starts:
1) Marco Andretti - 152
1) Ryan Hunter-Reay - 152
1) Scott Dixon - 152
1) Tony Kanaan - 152
5) Helio Castroneves - 151
6) Graham Rahal - 146
7) Will Power - 140
8) Justin Wilson - 120
9) Takuma Sato - 118
10) Ryan Briscoe - 116


Number of Championships:
1) Dario Franchitti - 3
1) Scott Dixon - 3
3) Ryan Hunter-Reay - 1
3) Simon Pagenaud - 1
3) Will Power - 1


Number of Indianapolis 500 Wins:
1) Dario Franchitti - 2
2) Alexander Rossi - 1
2) Dan Wheldon - 1
2) Helio Castroneves - 1
2) Juan Pablo Montoya - 1
2) Ryan Hunter-Reay - 1
2) Scott Dixon - 1
2) Tony Kanaan - 1


Most Wins:
1) Scott Dixon - 27
1) Will Power - 27
3) Ryan Hunter-Reay - 14
4) Dario Franchitti - 13
5) Helio Castroneves - 11
6) Simon Pagenaud - 9
7) Ryan Briscoe - 7
8) Six drivers - 4


Number of Different Winners: 24


Most Podiums:
1) Scott Dixon - 60
2) Will Power - 49
3) Helio Castroneves - 45
4) Dario Franchitti - 36
5) Tony Kanaan - 34
6) Ryan Hunter-Reay - 32
7) Ryan Briscoe - 26
8) Simon Pagenaud - 20
9) Graham Rahal - 19
10) Marco Andretti - 16


Number of Different Podium Finishers: 40


Most Top-Fives:
1) Scott Dixon - 88
2) Helio Castroneves - 66
2) Will Power - 66
4) Tony Kanaan - 58
5) Dario Franchitti - 51
6) Ryan Hunter-Reay
7) Ryan Briscoe - 37
8) Graham Rahal - 34
9) Marco Andretti - 29
10) Simon Pagenaud - 27


Number of Different Top-Five Finishers: 49


Most Top-Tens:
1) Scott Dixon - 112
2) Helio Castroneves - 102
3) Tony Kanaan - 95
4) Will Power - 92
5) Ryan Hunter-Reay - 77
6) Marco Andretti - 75
7) Dario Franchitti - 64
7) Ryan Briscoe - 64
9) Graham Rahal - 60
10) Justin Wilson - 53


Number of Different Top-Ten Finishers: 67


Most Starts Without a Win:
1) EJ Viso - 100
2) Alex Tagliani - 74
2) Oriol Servia - 74
4) Simona de Silvestro - 69
5) James Jakes - 66
6) Sebastian Saavedra - 61
7) Vitor Meira - 55
8) Hideki Mutoh - 52
9) Mario Moraes - 50
10) Jack Hawksworth - 49


Most Starts Without a Podium:
1) Alex Taglani - 74
2) Sebastian Saavedra - 61
3) Milka Duno - 43
4) Raphael Matos - 38
5) Tristan Vautier - 30
6) Ana Beatriz - 29
7) Alex Lloyd - 27
8) Tomas Scheckter - 26
9) Gabby Chaves - 23
10) Three drivers - 19


Most Poles:
1) Will Power - 38
2) Scott Dixon - 19
3) Helio Castroneves - 17
4) Dario Franchitti - 16
5) Ryan Briscoe - 12
6) Simon Pagenaud - 9
7) Ryan Hunter-Reay - 5
7) Takuma Sato - 5
9) Marco Andretti - 4
9) Tony Kanaan - 4


Number of Different Pole Winners: 22


Most Starts Without a Pole:
1) Charlie Kimball - 100
1) EJ Viso - 100
3) Oriol Servia - 74
4) Simona de Silvestro - 69
5) Danica Patrick - 68
6) James Jakes - 66
7) Vitor Meira - 55
8) Dan Wheldon - 53
9) Hideki Mutoh - 52
10) Mario Moraes - 50


Most Firestone Fast Six Appearances: 
1) Will Power - 61
2) Scott Dixon - 55
3) Helio Castroneves - 45
4) Dario Franchittti - 33
5) Ryan Hunter-Reay - 31
6) Ryan Briscoe - 30
7) Simon Pagenayd - 23
8) Justin Wilson - 21
9) Tony Kanaan - 19
10) James Hinchcliffe - 17


Number of Different Firestone Fast Six Driver Appearances: 33


Most Fastest Laps (in race):
1) Scott Dixon - 21
2) Will Power - 19
3) Helio Castroneves - 15
4) Ryan Briscoe - 12
5) Tony Kanaan - 11
6) Josef Newgarden - 8
7) Dario Franchitti - 7
7) Ryan Hunter-Reay - 7
9) Justin Wilson - 6
10) Ed Carpenter - 5


Number of Different Fastest Lap drivers: 34


Most Points Since 2008:
1) Scott Dixon - 4,969
2) Helio Castroneves - 4,455
3) Will Power - 4,357
4) Tony Kanaan - 3,904
5) Ryan Hunter-Reay - 3,814
6) Marco Andretti - 3,466
7) Graham Rahal - 3,442
8) Ryan Briscoe - 3,033
9) Dario Franchitti - 2,572
10) Simon Pagenaud - 2,559


Highest Average Starting Position (min. 15 starts):
1) Will Power - 5.8
2) Scott Dixon - 6.5
3) Dario Franchitti - 6.6
4) Helio Castroneves - 7.1
5) Ryan Briscoe - 8.6
6) Simon Pagenaud - 8.7
7) Juan Pablo Montoya - 9.0
8) James Hinchcliffe - 9.6
9) Tony Kanaan - 10.4
10) Ryan Hunter-Reay - 11.0


Lowest Average Starting Position (min. 15 starts):
1) Pippa Mann - 23.4
2) Milka Duno - 22.3
3) Ana Beatriz - 21.0
4) Stefano Coletti - 19.6
5) Gabby Chaves - 19.4
6) Enrique Bernoldi - 18.9
7) Conor Daly - 18.8
8) Carlos Huertas - 18.8
9) Sebastian Saavedra - 18.7
10) Sarah Fisher - 18.7


Highest Average Finishing Position (min. 15 starts):
1) Dario Franchitti - 7.1
2) Scott Dixon - 7.2
3) Helio Castroneves - 8.3
4) Simon Pagenaud - 8.6
5) Will Power - 9.0
6) Juan Pablo Montoya - 9.2
7) Dan Wheldon - 9.8
8) Tony Kanaan - 9.9
9) Ryan Briscoe - 9.9
10) Danica Patrick - 11.0


Lowest Average Finishing Position (min. 15 starts):
1) Milka Duno - 21.0
2) Pippa Mann - 20.9
3) Ana Beatriz - 19.2
4) Sarah Fisher - 18.7
5) Stefano Coletti - 18.6
6) Enrqiue Bernoldi - 18.3
7) Sebastian Saavedra - 18.1
8) Simona de Silvestro - 17.6
9) Tomas Scheckter - 17.5
10) Bruno Junqueira - 17.5


Highest Change in Position:
1) Danica Patrick - +187
2) Charlie Kimball - +167
3) Oriol Servia - +164
4) Ed Carpenter - +140
5) Vitor Meira - +112
6) Dan Wheldon - +111
7) Gabby Chaves - +104
8) Conor Daly - +73
9) Marco Andretti - +72
10) Tony Kanaan - +67


Lowest Change in Position:
1) Will Power - -436
2) Takuma Sato - -252
3) James Hinchcliffe - -211
4) Helio Castroneves - 181
5) Ryan Briscoe - -153
6) Mike Conway - -103
7) Scott Dixon - -100
8) Josef Newgarden - -90
9) EJ Viso - -76
10) Sebastien Bourdais - -71


Most Laps Led:
1) Scott Dixon - 3,546
2) Will Power - 2,900
3) Helio Castroneves - 2,153
4) Dario Franchitti - 2,107
5) Tony Kanaan - 1,458
6) Ryan Briscoe - 1,381
7) Ryan Hunter-Reay - 985
8) Marco Andretti - 874
9) Simon Pagenaud - 699
10) Josef Newgarden - 679


Number of Drivers to Lead a Lap: 61


Number of Laps Completed:
1) Ryan Hunter-Reay - 23,224
2) Scott Dixon - 20,518
3) Helio Castroneves - 20,299
4) Tony Kanaan - 19,672
5) Marco Andretti - 19,363
6) Graham Rahal - 18,151
7) Will Power - 17,252
8) Ryan Briscoe - 15,813
9) Justin Wilson - 15,171
10) Ed Carpenter - 15,071


Total Laps Completed by All 100 Drivers: 469,880


Most Running At Finishes (RAFS):
1) Helio Castroneves - 139
2) Scott Dixon - 135
3) Ryan Hunter-Reay - 131
4) Graham Rahal - 128
5) Tony Kanaan - 127
5) Marco Andretti - 127
7) Will Power - 121
8) Ryan Briscoe - 99
9) Justin Wilson - 96
10) Charlie Kimball - 81


Highest Completion Percentage (RAF's / Starts x 100) (min. 15 starts):
1) Gabby Chaves - 95.7%
2) Danica Patrick - 95.6%
3) Alexander Rossi - 93.8%
4) Helio Castroneves - 92.1%
5) Simon Pagenaud - 92.0%
6) Juan Pablo Montoya - 90.0%
7) Dario Franchitti - 89.3%
8) Scott Dixon - 88.8%
9) Oriol Servia - 87.8%
10) Graham Rahal - 87.7%


Lowest Completion Percentage (RAF's / Starts x 100) (min. 15 starts):
1) Enrique Bernoldi - 46.7%
2) Mika Duno - 51.2%
3) Tomas Scheckter - 57.7%
4) Takuma Sato - 62.7%
5) AJ Foyt IV - 63.2%
6) Mike Conway - 63.9%
7) Sebastian Saavedra - 65.6%
8) Mario Moraes - 66.0%
9) Pippa Mann - 66.7%
10) Simona de Silvestro - 68.1%


Number of Nations Represented: 23


Nations Represented With The Most Drivers:
1) United States of America - 29
2) United Kingdom - 16
3) Brazil - 12
4) France - 7
5) Canada - 5
5) Colombia - 5
7) Australia - 3
7) Italy - 3
7) Japan - 3
7) Venezuela - 3


Most Indy Lights Starts Among the 100 IndyCar Drivers:
1) Wade Cinningham - 64
2) Jeff Simmons - 60
3) Marty Roth - 53
4) Jaime Camara - 42
5) Mario Dominguez - 39
6) Sebastian Saavedra - 38
7) JR Hildebrand - 33
8) Stefan Wilson - 32
9) James Davison - 31
10) Ana Beatriz - 29


Number of Drivers Who Raced in Indy Lights: 44


Most Formula 1 Starts Among the 100 IndyCar Drivers:
1) Rubens Barrichello - 326
2) Jean Alesi - 201
3) Jacques Villeneuve - 163
4) Juan Pablo Montoya - 95
5) Takuma Sato - 92
6) Max Chilton - 35
7) Enrique Bernoldi - 27
7) Sebastien Bourdais - 27
9) Justin Wilson - 16
10) Giorgio Pantano - 14


Number of Drivers Who Race in Formula 1: 13


All Drivers Who Raced in NASCAR from the 100 IndyCar Drivers (as of 10-5-2016) and their number of starts:
1) Kurt Busch - 569
2) John Andretti - 393
3) AJ Allmendinger - 292
4) Juan Pablo Montoya - 255
5) Danica Patrick - 147
6) Stanton Barrett - 22
7) Dario Franchitti - 10
8) Jacques Villeneuve - 4
9) Scott Sharp - 1



A lot of stats to share! Thanks for reading! If there's anything you want to know (within reason), I can probably do some quick research and get the results you want.

-Matthew Hickey